pregnancy

There's a theory we already know the name of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's baby.

In the early hours of Monday morning, London time, Meghan Markle gave birth to a baby boy with Prince Harry by her side.

The royal baby name, however, is yet to be announced.

“We are pleased to announce that Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Sussex welcomed their firstborn child in the early morning on May 6th, 2019. Their Royal Highnesses’ son weighs 7lbs. 3oz,” the palace said in a statement.

“The Duchess and baby are both healthy and well, and the couple thank members of the public for their shared excitement and support during this very special time in their lives.”

While the Sussex Royal Instagram account have promised more details in the coming days, there’s a theory we already know the name of the royal baby.

Let us explain.

Last week, a conspiracy theory emerged after amateur royal detectives realised that three URLs are activated on the royal website, while other potential baby names aren’t.

The URLs in question are:

https://www.royal.uk/prince-arthur

https://www.royal.uk/prince-alexander

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https://www.royal.uk/prince-james

So Arthur, Alexander and James could very well be the name of our newest royal.

While there are no actual pages set up for the three names, they redirect to the home page “https://www.royal.uk/royal-family”.

Add to the equation that these URLS are the exact same format as Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis‘s, and we have ourselves a case.

But that’s not all.

If you still aren’t convinced, other popular names, such as Grace and Edward, take us to a “Page not found” landing page, rather than redirecting us back to the “Royal Family” home page, which is… suspicious.

royal baby triplets
Image: Official Royal Website.

A palace spokesperson has since confirmed that the URLs are not suspicious, but were actually set up during some form of a... user experience mission.

"A large number of search term redirects were set up some time ago on royal.uk. This was in order to improve user experience. For guidance you will note that other names preceded by ‘prince’ or ‘princess’ produce the same result," they told Yahoo UK

Riiiiiiight.

Now it's confirmed that the royal baby is, in fact, a boy, the URLs seem even more suspicious.

Luckily, it's likely we won't have to wait long to find out once and for all.

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