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State by state: Here are the COVID-19 close contact isolation rules where you live.

As we head into Christmas, many of us are concerned about being named a COVID-19 close contact. 

Depending on what state you live and your vaccination status, getting 'pinged' as a close contact may see you isolating for a matter of days or weeks during the holiday period.

To help you keep track of the rules - including the new requirements introduced by NSW - we've rounded up everything you need to know about close contacts where you live. 

Here's your handy state by state guide. 

New South Wales. 

Earlier this week, NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet announced changes to how NSW Health defines a close contact, placing more of a focus on households. 

"If you are deemed to be a close contact, it would generally be a member from your household," he said on Wednesday. "[However] there may be occasions where [NSW] Health may determine outside of that definition that you would be a close contact."

He also announced changes to isolation rules, with close contacts no longer required to isolate for seven days.

Instead, if you are deemed a close contact, you will only need to have a PCR test and wait for a negative result before leaving isolation. 

That said, if you live in the same household as someone who has COVID-19 or were in a high-risk setting at the time of transmission, you will still need to have a PCR test and isolate for seven days, regardless of the result.

More rules about casual contacts in NSW can be found here. 

Victoria. 

In Victoria, contacts are defined under four categories; household, social, workplace or education. 

Household contacts are those who either live with someone with COVID-19 or have spent more than four hours with them in a house, accommodation or care facility. If you a fully vaccinated and named a household contact, you will need to get a PCR test and quarantine at home for seven days. You are also required to get tested again on day six. If it comes back negative, you can leave quarantine on day seven. If you are not fully vaccinated you will need to get a PCR test and quarantine at home for 14 days. On day 13 you need to get tested again and if you receive a negative result, you can leave on day 14.

If you are deemed a social contact then you have spent time with someone (who doesn’t live with you) who has COVID-19. Social contacts are strongly recommended to get a PCR test and isolate until you get a negative result. 

Workplace or education contacts are those who were in the same indoor space with another worker who had COVID-19, or if you or your child went to school/childcare with someone who has COVID-19. In these cases, you need to get a PCR test within 24 hours of being notified and isolate immediately until you receive a negative result.

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Australian Capital Territory.

If you are deemed a close contact in the ACT, you will need to do four things; immediately quarantine, complete an ACT Contact Declaration Form (unless directed otherwise when contacted by ACT Health), get tested immediately and follow any advice provided by ACT Health. 

How long you will need to isolate will depend on whether or not you've been fully vaccinated.

If you are fully vaccinated, you will need to isolate for seven days from after you came into contact with the person with COVID-19, regardless of your test result. On day six, you will need to do another test. If it comes back negative and you do not have any COVID-19 symptoms, you can leave isolation after 11:59pm on day seven.

However, you will also need to test again on day 12 or 13. 

For those who aren't fully vaccinated, you will need to quarantine for a full 14 days, regardless of a negative test result. 

You will also need to test again on day six and day 12 or 13. If your day 12 test is negative and you do not have any symptoms, you can leave isolation after 11:59pm on day 14. 

There are also rules for causal contacts which you can find here.

Queensland. 

Over in Queenland, close contacts will need to quarantine for 14 days from the time you were at the venue and get tested at the earliest opportunity. You must stay in quarantine regardless of the result. 

You are also required to complete an online close contact form, after which you will be contacted by Queensland Health. 

If you are living with others, then they will be named secondary contacts and have their own rules to follow. 

Secondary contacts must immediately quarantine for 14 days or until receiving further instruction.

However, you only need to get tested if you develop symptoms, after which you will need to isolate until you receive a negative result, or if anyone in your household tests positive.

You can find more information about causal and low-risk contacts here.

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South Australia. 

South Australia recently introduced a Test, Trace, Isolate and Quarantine (TTIQ) model on November 23, which requires fewer people to quarantine and allows for shorter quarantine time. 

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"Under the new TTIQ model, anyone identified as a casual contact or a close contact of someone who is COVID-19 positive will be advised by SA Health and provided with advice on what is required with regards to quarantining and getting tested," the SA Health website reads.

Western Australia. 

If you're a close contact in Western Australia, you can expect to be contacted by Western Australia's health department who will give you specific information about what to do. 

"When close and casual contacts in a location can be comprehensively traced such as a workplace, family’s house, or friend’s house there is no need to publicly release the location, as all contacts are tracked and contacted as a priority," their website reads. 

"However, when the positive case has visited publicly accessible locations and close and casual contacts are not as readily identifiable, the location is released to assist with the public health response."

If you've visited one of the exposure sites listed on their website, you're urged to get tested immediately and isolate until you receive a negative result, unless you are advised otherwise.

Northern Territory. 

Over in the Northern Territory, those who have visited a public exposure site listed at the relevant dates and times listed on the government website must do three things; get tested, immediately quarantine for 14 days and call the COVID-19 Hotline on 1800 490 484 and identify yourself as a close contact.

There are also rules for casual and low-risk contacts and those who have visited a location of concern, which you can find here. 

Tasmania.

In Tasmania, close contact rules depend on whether or not you've been fully vaccinated. 

If you're vaccinated, you must immediately quarantine for seven days and get tested. You will also need to get tested again on day five or six and if you receive a negative result, you can leave quarantine after seven days. For the following seven days, you will need to avoid high-risk settings and get tested against on day 12 or 13.

If you're not vaccinated, you will need to quarantine for 14 days and get tested. You will also need to get tested again on day 12 or 13. If you receive a negative result, you can leave quarantine after 14 days. 

You can find rules for casual contacts and low-risk exposure here.

Feature Image: Getty.