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'A little girl with big dreams': Aya Maasarwe's sister Noor shares a tribute to her sister.

In the past few days, Noor Maasarwe has been through absolute hell.

Last Tuesday, her sister Aya Maasarwe was murdered on her way home from a comedy show in Melbourne.

Now, Noor has posted to Instagram to express her grief at the loss of her 21-year-old sister Aya, who was living in Melbourne on a student exchange program.

“A little girl with BIG dreams,” Noor wrote.

LISTEN: How much do we deserve to know about the final moments of a woman’s life? The Mamamia Out Loud team discuss….

“She was living a dream in Melbourne, a dream that ended up being worse than a nightmare,” she continued.

Accompanying a photo of a painting made by Aya, Noor went on to explain how Aya was on a FaceTime call with another one of her sisters when she was horrifically attacked.

 

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A little girl with BIG dreams, that how Aiia was. this is a painting Aiia painted in 2014. she was living a dream in Melbourne, a dream that ended up being worst than a nightmare. Violence against women is not a women issue, it is a men issue. We tell women if they feel unsafe to make a call so that they can feel safe. but Aiia was on the phone with my sister Ruba when all that happen. BUT What do we tell men to do? Do we tell the how to behave? we tell them nothing!That’s what we tell them. BUT when NEED to tell them something from now on! Let’s make the world a better place for us to survive in and for the next generation. I pray and hope that this won’t happen again. No one deserve to be treated like that. No matter where they come from where they are What they believe in WE ARE ALL HUMANS AT THE END AND THAT’S WHAT MATTER. A BIG Thanks to the people of Australia, Baqa al Gharbiyye and people from around the world for their love, care and support. Reminding us that there are still good people in the world.

A post shared by Noor Masarwe (玛莎娃) (@noormassarwa) on

“We tell women if they feel unsafe to make a call so that they can feel safe. But Aya was on the phone to my sister Ruba when all that happened,” she wrote.

“But what do we tell men to do? Do we tell them how to behave? We tell them nothing,” she continued.

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Within the post, Aya also thanked the Australian public for their love and support.

“I pray and hope that this won’t happen again. No one deserves to be treated like that. No matter where they come from, where they are or what they believe in.”

Last night, Aya’s father Saeed gave a tear-filled interview on The Project before boarding the same plane that would be carrying his daughter’s body home for burial.

“Even in the night, in the dark you have star. Even in the dark you could see light,” Saeed said. “This is what Aya was – she looked every time in the light, in the positive.”

Her cousin Sharef added: “She is full of life, full of energy. So happy. Her smile makes you smile, her laugh makes you laugh.”

Saeed also thanked Australians for their support, adding that he wished for nothing but peace.

“I wish from our tragedy that people can change here a little. If this, our tragedy could make the world, make Australia also, more better and more beautiful and can save the live of more people. This is the message we want to send.”

On Monday night, hundreds of people gathered to farewell the 21-year-old at a mosque in Melbourne.

Codey Herrmann, 20, has been charged with Aya’s rape and murder. He will remain in custody until appearing in court again in June.

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