The four-step method for making perfect roast potatoes involves a surprising ingredient.

Video by MWN

Anyone who says they don’t like roast potatoes is lying. They’re a liar.

We don’t know why anyone would lie about such a thing, but everyone knows no Sunday dinner is complete without many, many potatoes.

Any dinner, really.

But eating them is only one half of the story. First, you have to roast them. That part is where it gets a bit crunchy.

Every family has their own take on what makes for the perfect roast potato. But essentially we can agree they should be crunchy and salty on the outside and fluffy on the inside, yeah?

According to Good Housekeeping, there’s a very specific set of rules you need to follow if you want to pass yourself off as a spud God.

It goes something, nay, exactly like this:

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1. Parboil

First, you must parboil (half boil) your potatoes so they’re slightly soft and easier to roughen up. This results in the crispy delicious outside you want.

The Good Housekeeping cookery team (yes, cookery team) instructs to parboil the potatoes for no longer than 12 minutes, before leaving them to dry for three minutes.

You could fudge these times a little, but would you really want to risk it? Didn’t think so.

potatoes
Precious. Image: Getty.

2. Shake

Next, Good Housekeeping says to shake your three-minute dried spuds in a colander. As in what you rinse your pasta in.

This step works to roughen up the edges before roasting. Don't get lazy and skip this step, OK?

Good Housekeeping will know.

3. Flour

Now for the secret ingredient - flour.

Sprinkle your potatoes with regular ole flour, which Good Housekeeping says will crisp the eff out of your potatoes.

We paraphrased.

4. Roast... in hot oil

Finally, throw your potatoes into a roasting dish and cover with oil.

BUT it's got to be pre-heated oil rather than straight from the bottle. This, Good Housekeeping insists is the only way to stop your spuds from going soggy.

5. Eat

*Self-explanatory*

And that is how one must roast their potatoes. And turn into a potato from eating so many of said potatoes.

How does your family's roast potato recipe stack up to this one? How do you roast your potatoes?

Speaking of roasting things, Matt Moran told us how to roast the perfect chook too. Get it in your ears below.

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