beauty

Zoe Foster Blake shares an easy solution to tame uber thick pregnancy hair.

There’s a lot of things they don’t tell you about pregnancy.

In addition to the swelling stomach and morning sickness, you can also experience sore boobs, constipation, extra sweat… and thicker hair.

“One of pregnancy’s popular side effects is thick hair. But my hair also becomes wig-like, lank and obnoxiously heavy. Texture and shape abandon me; my usual styling sorcery is futile,” author Zoe Foster Blake wrote on Instagram last night.

“I recognise that on the scale of World Problems, this hovers somewhere near zero, but should you also be in the thick hair camp and wish for more textured, defined hair, this may be of help.”

One of pregnancy’s popular side effects is thick hair. But my hair also becomes wig-like, lank and obnoxiously heavy. Texture and shape abandon me; my usual styling sorcery is futile. I recognise that on the scale of World Problems, this hovers somewhere near zero, but should you also be in the thick hair camp and wish for more textured, defined hair, this may be of help: 1. Get a thin-out. I went to my hairdresser today (photo on left is before shot) with designs on a blunt bob, but was talked out of it. Thankfully. Hormonal hair decisions are bad hair decisions. @hairbylaurenm kept it long-ish, but sliced through the mid-lengths to ends like Eddie goddamn Scissorhands to remove bulk, and make it “rattier and stringier and lighter” a request she was only partially offended by. (She also did some killer colour, as you can see.) 2. Let your hair dry as much as poss before you style it. Even better, wash it at night and roughly dry it off, then style dry/shape it in full the next morning. Wash as little as possible cos it takes ages/is dull/dry shampoo exists. 3. Use “dirty-uppers” to add texture and sass. I apply a texture spray or mousse (I love Oribe Surfcomber) and roughly blow-dry it through freshly washed hair before bed for grit and easy styling the next day. On dry hair, I either use a sea salt or texture spritz all over (there are millions of good ones, I like O&Ms) for roughness, and anti-boofness. OR, if I want soft definition and separation I turn to texture balms and cremes that make the hair smooth but piecey, (like Oribe Matte Waves), and make you look like you may be French and 19 and in a band. Or, Alexa Chung. Oh and one final thing: remember to laugh at my post in six months where I complain about my hair all falling out. Cheers.

A post shared by ZOË FOSTER BLAKE (@zotheysay) on

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While the temptation can be to cut your hair super short to combat the new weight and thickness – as Foster Blake was thinking – don’t. As she puts it, “Hormonal hair decisions are bad hair decisions”.

Instead her hairstylist Lauren Mackellar at Edwards and Co gave her a “thin-out” by “slicing through the mid-lengths to ends like Eddie goddamn Scissorhands to remove bulk”.

This effectively creates “invisible layers”.

“The layering technique I used on Zoe was the ‘Oribe Inner Layer’, a technique that creates texture and natural volume within the hair without having any heavy or blunt edges,” Mackellar told Mamamia.

Listen: Zoe Foster Blake shares her best-ever beauty tips. Post continues after audio.

“They work by visually taking out subtle pieces of hair from within the haircut and leaves it feeling light and easy to manage.”

It’s a great option to remove bulk without losing a lot of length.

“It’s great for those with really thick, heavy manes – but also can be adjusted for those with finer strands because it creates a kind of ‘scaffolding’ within the haircut which helps to hold the style in place – but without losing too much hair in the process like old-school layering techniques used to,” she says.

It’s not just for those experiencing thick hair either naturally or due to pregnancy.

“These type of layers appear seamlessly in the hair so they’re perfect for those with one-length hair that don’t want to commit to obvious layers that can then mean more styling on a daily basis,” she explains.

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“The result is more ‘cool-girl-hair’ than the 90’s ‘Rachel-cut’ for example… it’s like the updated way of wearing hair that more people are leaning towards because it looks natural and effortless.”

Even better, it doesn’t require blowwaving or fussing over hours of styling for it to look good. (Post continues after gallery.)

“It’s a great low maintenance option because it’s blended within hair and grows out without any issues,” she says.

Foster Blake also shared some tried and tested tips to dealing with your new hair once you’re out of the hairdressers chair.

“Let your hair dry as much as possible before you style it. Even better, wash it at night and roughly dry it off, then style dry/shape it in full the next morning,” she wrote.

And don’t be afraid to leave a little time in between washes.

“Use “dirty-uppers” to add texture and sass. I apply a texture spray or mousse (I love Oribe Surfcomber) and roughly blow-dry it through freshly washed hair before bed for grit and easy styling the next day,” she said.

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