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The sign that told Sophie Cachia she needed to take her baby daughter to the hospital.

Blogger and entrepreneur Sophie Cachia has shared the sign that told her she needed to call an ambulance for her baby daughter, Florence.

Posting a video to her 230,00 Instagram followers on Tuesday, the mum-of-two spoke of the situation no parent hopes to find themselves in.

“After being taken in an ambo on our second night and told to come back to the hospital anytime we weren’t sure, this is what we took her back for on our last night,” The Young Mummy writer captioned the footage of her nine-month-old daughter struggling to breathe.

After being taken in an ambo on our second night and told to come back to the hospital anytime we weren’t sure, this is what we took her back for on our last night. No, we’re not doctors or trained professionals, but with Bobby being an asthmatic (and has been hospitalized multiple times with asthma attacks), we’re well aware of the signs to look for. The sucking in under her throat & her ribs means she’s working really hard to breathe. We used prior knowledge & listened to our gut and Jaryd took her in just before bed time. Lucky, because the poor thing spent the night hooked up to oxygen. I only took this video just before they left in case she got to the hospital and was breathing fine, I always prefer to have something to show them upon arrival. PS: @tinyheartsfirstaid your training comes in to play more than I notice ????????????❤️ Update: Florence is doing VERY well and loving being back in her own bed. Thank you again for all the love. Xxx

A post shared by Sophie Cachia (@sophiecachia_) on

“No, we’re not doctors or trained professionals, but with Bobby being an asthmatic (and has been hospitalized (sic) multiple times with asthma attacks), we’re well aware of the signs to look for. The sucking in under her throat & her ribs means she’s working really hard to breathe.

“We used prior knowledge & listened to our gut and Jaryd took her in just before bed time. Lucky, because the poor thing spent the night hooked up to oxygen.”

Thankfully, Florence is reportedly “doing VERY well and loving being back in her own bed”.

If you or a loved one appears to be struggling to breathe, Asthma Victoria says the signs of an asthma attack are as follows:

  • Obvious difficulty breathing
  • Cannot speak a full sentence in one breath
  • Tugging in of the skin between ribs or at base of neck
  • May have cough or wheeze
  • Reliever medication not lasting as long as usual

If Ventolin (the blue/grey reliever) does not alleviate the individual’s symptoms after actioning their asthma first aid plan, please call 000. While the ambulance is on its way, sit the affected person upright, be calm and reassuring, and do not leave them alone. Give four puffs of medication every four minutes until emergency services arrive.

You can find out more about asthma, and how to deal with an asthma attack, right here.

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