true crime

As a child, Kim fell pregnant twice to her abusive dad. Now, she's making him pay.

Kim Chown could have kept details of her father’s horrific abuse of her as a child out of the public conciousness.

No one would blame the 53-year-old UK woman for electing to have her name remain completely out of the reporting of the court case against her father, Francis Beaumont, now aged 79.

The university lecturer was found guilty and sentenced to 20 years jail for five counts of rape of his daughter, which began when she was just 11 years old, The Mirror reports.

But instead of remaining anonymous, as the court allows victims of this kind of crime to be, Kim chose to share her story and speak out. She hopes that by doing so, it will encourage other victims of sexual abuse to report their experiences.

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“I am one of the surviving victims of childhood sexual abuse inflicted by a father of his daughter,” she said.

“Not many people in my situation get to this point in their lives. Many take it as a secret to their graves, others take their own lives.”

Leeds Crown Court heard that Kim was subjected to “petrifying” abuse as a child, which all began when they moved to Kenya. At times, her father threatened to dissolve her body in a bath of acid or suffocate her with a plastic bag.

Kim was also coerced into drinking alcohol – which led to an alcohol addiction for years after she escaped him.

Beaumont’s rape of his daughter, which continued until she was 20, resulted in two pregnancies and two abortions.

In 1985, Kim told her mother – and police – about the abuse, but her father made her sign a retraction. It wasn’t for another 30 years until Kim managed to will herself to report her father again. This time he couldn’t stop her from pressing charges and pursuing justice.

In her victim impact statement, printed in The Mirror, Kim said she only refers to Beaumont as “that monster” now for all he had taken from her.

“Despite having such a wonderful family of my own and happy memories of the years I have had with my husband seeing our children growing up, there has still been a cloud hanging over me.”

“A cloud full of emotional baggage, shame, guilt, confusion, anger, bitterness, despair and sadness.”

And while Kim said that “indirectly” her father’s actions made her “the strong person I am today”, she still wishes her life could have been different.

“He stole my innocence, fun and enjoyment, freedom, peace of mind and security.”

“I may as well have been chained to my bed as I was not allowed the freedom that every other child of my age had.”

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