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A "mortified" Australian mum says her daughter's own school slut shamed its female students.

A mother has accused her child’s school of “slut-shaming” and “victim blaming” its female students in the wake of the recent online pornography scandal involving several Australian high schools.

In a passionate Facebook post that has been shared more than 10,000 times, Melbourne mother Catherine Manning said she was “mortified” to learn that Year 7 to 10 girls at state school Kambrya College were hauled into a special single-sex assembly during which they were told not to wear short skirts or to send naked selfies to boys.

“At the assembly my daughter and her friends said they were told they had to check the length of their skirts, and that anything that doesn’t touch their knees or below by Monday morning would be deemed inappropriate. They were informed that this was to ‘protect their integrity’,” Manning wrote.

“They were also told not to post photos of themselves online, and to refuse any request from a boyfriend for a ‘sexy selfie’, as their boyfriends will only be around for a couple of days; maximum a year; but definitely not in ten years’ time.

“They were told the boys are distracted by their legs, and that boys don’t respect girls who wear short skirts.”

The assembly was reportedly in response to revelations first reported by Mamamia that images of underage girls were among those being circulated via an online pornography ring.

Authorities are currently investigating the forum, which contained multiple folders that appeared to house explicit images of students from several Australian high schools.

The Kambrya College’s Assistant Principle Jo Wastle confirmed to The Age that the school had discussed being named in relation to the site.

“As far as we know none of our students were affected, but they had heard about it and we wanted to set their minds at rest,” Wastle said.

She also confirmed that single sex assemblies had been staged this week, during which students were spoken to about “dress codes, sexting, social media and respect”.

“We chose to separate boys and girls and different years to create smaller groups and encourage open dialogue,” she said.


“They feel judged and victimised by school staff, like all eyes are on them, and they don’t feel comfortable around their male peers,” she wrote.

“The problem is not with the girls and the length of their skirts, nor whether or not they choose to share photos with their boyfriends or anyone else. It’s with the boys themselves; their sense of entitlement and sexist attitudes towards women and girls, their lack of respect, and the trust they CHOOSE to break.

“This school has failed miserably by fighting sexism with sexism. When will they ever learn?”

READ: “The horrifying moment I found my name on the ‘Aussie Sluts’ forum.”

Featured image: iStock