Uber cars have turned pink to help breast cancer victims and we’re cheering.

Video by Mamamia

Uber cars have turned pink for breast cancer, as part of a new partnership with the McGrath Foundation.

The Foundation was started by Jane McGrath, the wife of Australian cricket legend Glenn MGrath, while she was undergoing treatment for breast cancer in 2005.

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In receiving treatment for secondary cancer, Jane was given access to a breast cancer nurse for the first time. She found the support helped her both physically and mentally while she was enduring, and recovering from, the cancer treatment. It was her dream to give every breast cancer patient in Australia access to a breast cancer nurse.

Jane died from breast cancer in 2008 and, since then, her husband Glenn has continued her legacy.

Now, Uber is involved.

Jane McGrath’s best friend Tracy Bevan explains how the McGrath Foundation began and the work it does. Post continues below.

Until January 20 – during the time of the 9th annual Pink Cricket Test in Sydney – Uber users will see the app’s car icons have turned pink to help raise awareness.

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As well as this, new Uber users are offered a $20 free ride, and the app donates $10 to the McGrath Foundation for the trip.

Signing up to Uber now will help raise money to support breast cancer patients, and if you’re in Sydney you get to ride from the city to the Eastern Beaches free of charge because it costs less than $20.

It’s not the only change for the Foundation, which has launched new branding and a fresh logo for the new year.

McGrath Foundation. Image via Wikipedia.

"The new McGrath Foundation logo represents the warm embrace of the care and support provided by McGrath Breast Care Nurses, and also reflects the energy and vitality of supporters, and friends of the McGrath Foundation," Glenn told Bega District News. 

The McGrath Foundation has placed 110 breast cancer nurses in communities around Australia. Collectively, these nurses have helped more then 50,000 families dealing with breast cancer.

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