couples

Do childbirth photos belong on Facebook?

Back in the day, you had to wait a few hours or even days to hear about, much less see the result, of a friend’s labour and delivery. But thanks to social media and mobile devices, birth can be live-blogged and childbirth photos shared just minutes after delivery. According to a survey from Huggies of 1000+ new mums, 67% of them share just-born pics straight from the delivery room.

Over at our American sister site, Sasha Emmons writes: "However, what do the friends and family of the 67% feel about seeing photos of what used to be an ultra-private moment? Has it all just gotten to be TMI? When I had my son, I knew my long-distance parents and friends were waiting to hear the baby news, so I posted childbirth photos of my swaddled baby burrito a few hours later. Everyone felt in-the-loop quickly. And let’s face it: I wanted to show off the fruits of my, uh, labour.

"However, humor site STFU Parents has examples of people posting graphic shots of their C-section, in-progress water births or babies covered in afterbirth goo, and I think we can all agree maybe those should be reserved for the inner circle -- or at least people who express interest in seeing them. I don’t need to see my 4th grade friend’s placenta pop up on my screen while I’m eating lunch at my desk."

At iVillage Australia we've been celebrating childbirth with an ongoing gallery of amazing photos, called The birth moment that makes all men weep. It includes a photo of my daughter being born via c-section. Admittedly I didn't have a Facebook page when she was born, but my husband shared our childbirth photo (below) with friends via text message.

And Sasha's article got me thinking - was my photo TMI? I'd love to hear your thoughts on sharing birth pics via social media. Have you done it? How do you feel when others do it? 

 Main photo credit: ANDREJS ZEMDEGA/E+/GETTY IMAGES

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