A woman spent $2200 cutting holes into her cheeks, driven by jealousy of her son.

Video by Mamamia

AJ Weir is a 44-year-old London beauty blogger and mother, and for the last 10 years she has been investigating a way to surgically create dimples on her cheeks.

Much to her surprise, and to her delight, earlier this year it was made possible courtesy of a few thousands dollars, half an hour of surgery and a few deliberate holes cut into her cheeks.

Writing on her blog Fortified Beauty, Weir wrote that having dimples was something she had always obsessed over.

“Ever since I can remember I have always been envious of those cute little cheek flaws.

“Over the years I just had to look on in awe of those blessed with those little cute craters. In fact It was fair to say I was dimple obsessed,” she wrote.

Much to Weir’s envy, when she gave birth just over 11 years ago her own son was given the little “cheek flaw” she longed for herself.

A photo posted by Aj (@fortyfiedbeauty) on

Advertisement

“It was like our creator thought, poor cow let’s throw some onto the face of her child so she can look at them everyday as recompense. It’s a cold cruel world we live in.”

More than that, Weir told The Mirror she had always seen dimples as a sign of beauty.

“If somebody has dimples, I will try to stick my finger in their face. It’s really weird, but I just love them. I see them as a sign of being cute,” she told the paper.

However, after dabbling a little bit in plastic surgery in the past, Weir thought there must be a way to make the procedure possible.

“I took to the wondrous web and low and behold I found the pot of gold at the end of my dimple-lined rainbow. It WAS now possible to surgically create dimples,” she wrote on her blog.

Deciding to book herself in for the $2200 surgery, Weir explained the procedure itself wasn’t particularly invasive or time-consuming.

A photo posted by Aj (@fortyfiedbeauty) on

“The surgery itself isn’t major. In fact it is completed under a local anaesthetic and takes around 20- 30 minutes,” she explained.

“A punch biopsy instrument is placed against the inside of your cheek and circular motions are made to cut through the fat and cheek muscle. A circular core composed of these tissues is removed, leaving the skin intact, which will create a shallow cylindrical-shaped defect under the skin.”

Like any notable surgery, Weir explained the benefits and results took time to show.

“I did look like a chipmunk, with two craters in my face and I bruised quite badly on one side so I looked like I had been in some sort of odd accident.”

Addressing those who could be critical of Weir’s desire to put her face under the knife for a couple of dimples, Weir wrote that it’s not something that has altered the path of her life, but regardless it is something that has made her happy.

“Some would argue that this is a totally unnecessary cosmetic procedure and they have a point. Not having dimples would not have ruined my life, and having dimples is not going to make me more successful richer or likeable. It was my personal choice nothing more nothing less,” she wrote.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION
FROM OUR NETWORK