fashion

A brilliant Berlei ad showing boobs of all shapes, sizes and ages is banned on Facebook.

It’s one of the most relatable ads women are likely to come across.

In Berlei’s latest commercial (which you can watch above) to promote its new Womankind bra range, we see a diverse cast of women and their boobs experiencing everyday boob struggles.

Trying to squeeze into a sports bra. Dealing with straps that dig in and leave angry marks. Desperately trying to get some support from a strapless bra you saw on social media.

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Anyone else? Image: Berlei.

Pain, frustration and more free falling than you'd like for your boobs are all too common. It's refreshing to see an ad that tackles that.

In fact, more than 500 women were surveyed to come up with the idea for the ad but they won't be seeing it on Facebook any time soon.

After initially rejecting it, YouTube have now said they will allow it on the site.

The commercial has been rejected by Facebook for not complying with their current policies and fear of "potential offence to the community". An appeal by Berlei was also rejected.

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Ouch. Image: Berlei.

"The ad highlights the daily realities women have with their breasts in an honest and authentic way. Like the bra itself, the ad was designed to empower women to care for and invest in themselves," Berlei said in a statement to Mamamia.

As for why; Facebook's ad policy dictates that videos cannot focus on one body part, such as breasts, as Berlei's advert does. The pixelated nudity, overt focus on bouncing breasts and extreme close ups also contributed to the advert's rejection for advertising purposes.

Many might argue that there is much more offensive content already on Facebook, but there's a reason for that.

In response to Berlei, Facebook advised that their advertising policy is more conservative than user-published content as it is "pushed into the feeds of people who have not necessarily chosen to view it".

The brand argues the ruling is symptomatic of a larger issue.

"Berlei believes this case highlights society’s issues where breasts are classed as sexual property," they said.

"They also would like to change the narrative of how brands advertise to women and hope to be able to take their message to their online community without being suppressed."

Mamamia reached out to both Facebook and YouTube for comment but they had not responded at the time of publication. 

Do you think the ad should be allowed on Facebook?

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