It’s official: Here are five of the worst Netflix movies of all time.

Video by MWN

 

You can’t go past a good Netflix movie.

What you can go past is a, erm, pretty damn average one.

Netflix has served us up some bloody great movies lately – When We First Met, Mudbound and The Meyerowitz Stories – just to name a few.

But it also delivered a few underwhelming original movies and a few, well, shockers.

To help you avoid a crappy binge session this weekend, we’ve rounded up some of Netflix’s biggest flops:

Step Sisters

Critic score: 29%

Advertisement

Audience score: 45%

Step Sisters is kind of like if Step Up and Pitch Perfect and Dear White People all got together and had an orgy and then ended up having a very basic movie baby together.

It’s as if Netflix went to their little movie making machine and typed in ‘college-based comedy’, ‘some kind of competitive sport’, and ‘woke pls’ and this is what came out.

LISTEN: Did you know Dawson’s Creek was based on the writer’s real life? The Binge discusses the real people (and yes, the real creek!) behind our favourite 90s teen drama. Post continues after audio…

In short, it’s a dance movie that tries to send an important message about diversity and inclusion and wokeness etc… but fails.

The good news is it’s so lame, you’ll probably love it. You can read my full review here.

Bright

Critic score: 27%

Audience score: 86%

Bright is, well, a lot of things. It’s a cop fantasy drama set in a dystopian future where Will Smith plays a futuristic version of all the characters he has played in the past.

Yep, he’s a cop who somehow manages to singlehandedly save the day… again.

In this movie he teams up with an orc rookie cop (Joel Edgerton) who is hated by the rest of the police force.

Together they have to protect a magical sword the rest of the world are trying to get their hands on.

Bright is supposedly a story about diversity and inclusion but mostly it’s about shiny swords, orcs and fairies, and Will Smith saving the day.

The Cloverfield Paradox

Critic score: 17%

Audience score: 58%

Netflix dropped The Cloverfield Paradox straight after the Super Bowl this year and it… flopped.

It’s a science fiction horror movie set in space. It follows a bunch of astronauts on board a space station who need to find a way home after accidentally travelling to an alternative universe.

It’s kind of like if Gravity and Cloverfield had a baby and that baby was really annoying.

The Open House

Critic score: 14%

Audience score: 10%

The Open House follows the story of Naomi (Piercy Dalton) and her son Logan (Dylan Minnette) who move into a relative’s vacation home after a death in the family.

The home – of course – is an isolated, sprawling mansion surrounded by woods. Because, as you’re probably aware, people in horror movies never move into simple, single-story houses in busy suburbs.

Naomi and Logan hardly had time to unpack their belongings and settle into their new digs when things start to get a little bit creepy.

You see, the house is currently on the market and every Sunday they have to vacate it for an open house. After the first open house, the mother and son duo start to think that there’s someone else in the house… they’re right.

While The Open House has all the trappings of a great horror movie, its confusing ending has left fans fuming. You can read my full review here.

LISTEN: Need a hit of 90s nostalgia? The Binge revisits the best bits from your favourite teen drama, including why we need justice for Jen Linley. Post continues after audio…

The Ridiculous 6

Critic score: 0%

Audience score: 31%

The Ridiculous 6 is… is… ridiculous.

It stars Adam Sandler as Tommy Stockburn AKA “White Knife”, a man who was raised in a Native American community.

When his outlaw dad is kidnapped, Stockburn sets off across the Wild West on a rescue mission with the five brothers he never knew he had – AKA the ridiculous 6.

The critics gave this movie a rating of 0%… so view at your own risk.

To read more from Keryn Donnelly, follow her on Facebook.

FROM OUR NETWORK
JOIN THE CONVERSATION