rogue

The dirty fruit videos Instagram doesn't want you to see.

Warning: This video might make you feel weird things. 

It’s the type of thing you can’t unsee.

Long fingers gently caressing different types of fruit, before descending deeply into their core, as juice oozes down the sides. Sometimes the juice squirts, and other times there’s a gaping hole left where the fingers first entered.

The only words that can be used to describe Stephanie Sarley’s ‘fruit fingering’ videos are ones we typically try to avoid at all costs: Moist. Penetration. Juicy. Squirt. *Shudders*

When Sarley first posted a video to Instagram of her fingering a blood orange, she said it was completely spontaneous. Like most people who do things on the Internet – she had no idea why she did it. She just did, and it went viral. But the responses to her work (‘lemon’ and ‘strawberry’ are among the best, in my opinion) have emblazoned it with meaning.

Now, the illustrator, printmaker, and artist says her art “challenges the gender confines men and women have to deal with. I fight to reclaim women’s sexuality.”

Earlier this year, she told the Guardian her blood orange video “is basically about personifying and empowering vaginas through humor and absurdity, and the acceptance of female sexuality at large. But all of these d**kheads took it and went, ‘Ew, period sex,’ and then called me a ‘stupid hoe'”.

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Stephanie, meet the Internet. Internet, meet Stephanie.

Indeed, Sarley has been at the centre of a fair amount of online controversy.

Her Instagram account, which currently has over 90,000 followers, was banned earlier this year, although it’s not exactly clear why. And she says she’s experienced severe online bullying.

Yet, she also didn’t expect to receive the amount of support she’s had since posting her first controversial blood orange video. Her work has been described as starting a “small revolution”, as “challenging society’s aversion to female sexuality.” and a prominent New York art critic even commented on one of her videos, “You. Are. Genius.”

Ultimately, Stephanie Sarley’s work does highlight the complex relationship between art and censorship, and causes us to analyse our own reactions to provocative art.

I’m still unsure how I feel about it. All I know is I’ll never look at a blood orange the same way again.

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