food

A brave mum asks: Is it fair to ask family members to chip in for Christmas dinner?

Hold onto your paper crowns. There’s a Christmas dinner dilemma that’s sparked a worldwide debate, and one unfortunate woman is at the centre of it.

The festive furore began when a mother revealed her plan to charge her family a small fee to cover the cost of their Christmas night meals.

“Am I being unreasonable to ask people to chip in for Christmas dinner?” she asked a group of fellow parents on the popular online forum Mumsnet.

The British woman suggested her family throw in the equivalent of less than $10 each in order to pay for the beef that “everyone wants”.

Big mistake. HUGE.

Apparently, it’s a festive faux pas for a host to ask their guests to pay for dinner, and many have labelled the mother an ungracious Grinch for even suggesting it.

Will you guys chuck me a fiver or what?

"Don't offer to host if you can't afford it," one mother replied on Mumsnet, only to be echoed by a chorus of agreers.

"I'd be exceedingly unimpressed if I'd hosted and paid for in previous years and was asked to chip in," one woman wrote.

Another proclaimed the idea was "not exactly in the spirit of Christmas."

The question quickly spread across the globe as various media outlets picked up the story, including 9 News Australia who posted it on their Facebook page.

Judging by the responses on the thread, Australians are a be a bit more pragmatic when it comes to the question of who should be footing the bill.

"Why should it be up to just one household to fork out all the costs? What if it's always held at the same household every year? Everyone should be putting their hands in their pockets and contributing one way or another," the top comment reads.

Most people agreed that while money wasn't necessarily the best way to split costs, everyone should be contributing something to the meal, whether it be drinks, dessert or a few deadpan gags from inside a Christmas cracker.

Where do you stand in the Great Christmas Debate of 2016?