pregnancy

The 'raw, stunning and hilarious' post birth photo that we are loudly applauding.

It was in an antenatal class that a midwife used the term “surfboard” to describe the sanitary pads she suggested we pack in our hospital bag.

A room full of nervous expectant mothers glanced around at each other. A pad the size of a surfboard? What the hell was going to happen to us after birth, and why hadn’t anyone mentioned this earlier?

A couple of weeks later as I was shopping for last minute baby stuff with my sister-in-law, I chucked a bag of maternity pads in my shopping basket.

My childfree sister-in-law laughed and threw in four more packets. She told me that her best friend had bled for six weeks after her baby was born.

How, HOW had I gotten to 36 weeks pregnant before I learned that not only would I bleed so much I would require surfboards in my undies, but that I would bleed for six weeks?

Like most stuff to do with birth and matters related to lady gardens, it’s still all kept quiet and hidden away despite the fact that it’s 2016.

And that’s why I am LOUDLY applauding blogger Amanda B from Every Child is a Blessing for sharing this “raw, stunning, messy, and freaking hilarious” photo on facebook.

“Nothing says welcome to motherhood like an adorable squishy baby, and a giant mom diaper,” she writes.

Ain’t that the truth.

And I’m not the only one applauding. The photo has been shared nearly 2000 times, and has over 17,000 likes on Facebook.

Australian blogger and photographer, Nami Clarke from Little Tsunami shared the photo on Instagram.

This image takes me straight back to antenatal classes and that time I first heard of the postpartum “hot tip”: take one maternity sanitary pad, split it open from the sides, stuff it with ice blocks and pop it in your undies. Not recommended if you feel like a leisurely stroll in something high-cut, but for the post-delivery shuffle – and once your sea legs have come back after the epidural wears off – it’s the ducks nuts! (So to speak). ???? #amandabacon who says: “Motherhood uncensored. I’m sharing this picture because it’s real. This is motherhood; it’s raw, stunning, messy, and freaking hilarious all rolled into one. Having a baby is a beautiful experience, and the realities of postpartum life aren’t spoken enough about. And definitely not photographed enough. Some people probably find this uncomfortable, but why? I seriously don’t get it! It’s probably because this part isn’t talked about. We all should try and educate, empower and embrace every aspect of childbirth, including moments like this. And do it while having a sense of humor. Nothing says welcome to motherhood like an adorable squishy baby, and a giant mom diaper. ???? Edit: My husband didn’t post this. He doesn’t even have Facebook. I did.” Thank you Amanda for granting Little Tsunami permission share your pic! ❤️???????? #motherhooduncensored #motherhood #motherhoodthroughinstagram #keepingmotherhoodreal #hottip #postpartum #birth #newborn #motherhoodmoments #reallife #family #littletsunami #welcometomotherhood #educate #empower #reality #lifewithanewborn #mumlife #momlife

A photo posted by Nami Clarke (@little_tsunami) on Jul 7, 2016 at 5:19am PDT

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Nami writes, “This image takes me straight back to antenatal classes and that time I first heard of the postpartum “hot tip”: take one maternity sanitary pad, split it open from the sides, stuff it with ice blocks and pop it in your undies. Not recommended if you feel like a leisurely stroll in something high-cut, but for the post-delivery shuffle – and once your sea legs have come back after the epidural wears off – it’s the ducks nuts!”

What other tips and tricks do you have to share with first time mothers?

Watch: The pregnancy questions you were too afraid to ask…

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