health

'Australia is 20 years behind.' Pete Evans doubles down on message that sunscreen is dangerous.

Pete Evans recently made headlines again when he advocated for sungazing.

This prompted the Australian Medical Association to issue a warning about following the celebrity chef’s advice… but Evans doesn’t care. In fact, he thinks it’s funny.

“I think it’s hilarious that people are advocating that we shouldn’t appreciate a sunrise or a sunset,” he said in an interview with News Corp.

“I mean, how warped is the reality of the world where medical professions are saying don’t look at a sunrise or a sunset because it could be bad for your health?”

He then brought up sunscreen – again – suggesting the ‘slip, slop, slap’ message we’ve all grown up reciting was a lie.

“Even today we have the mainstream media saying if we are walking to the bus we need to be lathering up in sunscreen every single day. I mean, is that not the most ludicrous thing that has ever been said in the history of humankind?”

“Most of the information that I am sharing is coming from leading doctors and scientists from America, Canada and the United Kingdom,” said the 46-year-old.

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“It’s very well accepted in those parts of the world, while Australia seems to be caught in this time warp of we’re about 20 years behind as far as our media seems to be, as far as what is considered common sense.”

In 2016 Evans first came under fire for his stance on sunscreen.

When asked by a fan what he used for sun protection, Evans responded by saying he “generally” doesn’t use any sunblock at all as he keeps an “all over tan all year”, and that people were “silly” for sunbathing wearing regular brands.

Addressing Evans’ original comments, the Cancer Council’s director of education Terry Slevin explained, “Australia experiences some of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world and we have strong evidence sunscreen reduces the risk of cancer.

“It’s surprising and disappointing that someone who has a public following would advise to the contrary,” he said.

“It’s dangerous for the people who follow his advice.”

Evans said he doesn’t feel frustrated by the public response to his claims because there is obviously a mainstream media conspiracy.

“Most of the information that I am sharing is coming from leading doctors and scientists from America, Canada and the United Kingdom,” he told news.com.au.

“It’s very well accepted in those parts of the world, while Australia seems to be caught in this time warp of we’re about 20 years behind as far as our media seems to be, as far as what is considered common sense.”

Previously, Evans, who has two daughters from a previous marriage, prompted outcry with his recipe for a bone marrow broth for babies.

The high levels of vitamin A in the DIY formula recipe was said by experts to contain extremely high levels of vitamin A for babies and inadequate levels of other nutrients.

In 2014, Evans posted a 2100-word diatribe on his Facebook page, criticising the Dieticians Association of Australia and the Heart Foundation, and suggesting Australia’s autism and mental illness rates are somehow linked to the healthy eating guidelines promoted by these two bodies.

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