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Oranges are being dumped at kid's soccer because parents simply can't be arsed cutting them up.

It’s half time at the under- six soccer.

The Rockets are up 2 – 1. It’s been a difficult first half.

Will Sheridan tripped over Marcus Lee’s boot and had a serious knee graze requiring two Wiggles band-aids.

Josh Andrews scored his first goal, much to the thrill of his watching parents, grandparents and uncles and aunts, but he was so excited no one had the heart to tell him it was an own goal. At one stage each team even had all their players on the field for at least four minutes (before there were tears, a needed toilet break and one child who was just too tired to do this any more mummy.)

Oranges at half time are no more. Image supplied.

Off the Rockets come and instead of huddling together over a traditional Tupperware container of cut-up orange quarters instead they wander over to their own parents (or entourage) for a bag of chips, a jelly snake or a quick munch on an apple before they hear the whistle blow for the second half.

No oranges you see because sadly oranges at half time are no more.

Can you believe it? The tradition, the institution that is the half time orange gone. Wiped from our children’s childhoods.

I'm trying very hard not to be outraged here because when I put it in perspective, really it is well, just an orange, a mere fruit but truthfully it kind of leaves me in despair.

Both my sons play junior sport in two separate teams – an under-7 team and an under-9 team and both teams, unrelated, have cut the orange.

For one team its an allergy thing one kid had a citrus allergy and the other parents didn’t object as most of the kids “didn’t like oranges anyway."

How many times last season did I have to do the 9pm Friday night dash to Woolies to stock up on a bag of navels? Image via IStock.
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The other team has canned the humble fruit as the whole rigmarole of 'orange duty' each week was just too much hard work.

On one hand I can see their point. How many times last season did I have to do the 9pm Friday night dash to Woolies to stock up on a bag of navels when I checked the orange roster too late once again and had to scramble to meet my duty as soccer-mum.

How many times did I realise just one minute to half time on a freezing foggy winter’s morning that said bag of navels all neatly cut up was not actually at the soccer field but was still sitting at home on the kitchen bench.

The kids don’t eat them anyway they said.

It’s a waste of time and effort and who can be arsed cutting them up.

We're all too busy, its another thing we all just forget.

So the oranges at half time were squashed.

It’s a waste of time and effort and who can be arsed cutting them up? Image supplied.
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After a glass of wine with a friend the other day while I was denouncing the downfall of modern day society in the form of the orange ban I was startled to hear that this wasn’t anything new.

“Na, our team did it years ago" a mum of older kids told me. "Too much hard work and no one eats ‘em the kids just bring a bottle of PowerAde instead.”

She's right, these days many, many junior sporting codes have a “lolly’ roster instead where one family brings a bag of snakes for the players to be shared either at half time or at the end of the game. While we mums often grumble about the amount of sugar our kids consume it seems there is nothing hard about stopping at the servo on the way to the game to grab your bag of Allens.  A British study two years ago found that 45 per cent of kids eat chips, chocolate and lollies during sports and 43% choose fizzy and sugary drinks over water.

These days many, many junior sporting codes have a “lolly’ roster instead. Image via IStock.

Oranges were ditched during half time for many sports years ago in the UK and judging by a typical social media reaction to it you can see why. This this being a normal type of comment:

“So, do they wash their hands before and after eating the orange? The banana is a cleaner fruit to eat. It is possible to peel it and eat it without becoming sticky all over. Grapes and dried fruit can be eaten cleanly also.”

The poor old orange has been categorized as being too much hard work.

In 2009 Netball Queensland banned the citrus fruit as they were deemed too acidic for player's teeth. Image via IStock.
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And maybe even bad for you....  in 2009 Netball Queensland banned the citrus fruit as they were deemed too acidic for player's teeth.

Perhaps we’ll go the way many children’s teams in the US have turning to scientific sports bars at half time. You can pick them up in a box of 20 or so, store them in the boot of your car knowing they will never go off and there you have it a snack with creatively labeled ingredients such as "Hydrolysed Collagen Protein", "Maltitol" and "Hydrolyzed Gelatin" - never to be forgotten.

Perhaps we’ll go the way many children’s teams in the US have turning to scientific sports bars at half time. Image via IStock.

Perhaps the orange ban is for the best. After all with a protein bar there is not a sticky finger, a time-poor parent or an unhappy child in sight.

Do your kids still have oranges at half time?

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