Macquarie Dictionary announces its word of 2015.

 

Macquarie Dictionary’s Word of the Year is supposed to be one that encapsulates the past year’s events and is indicative of the trends that impacted the nation.

Following on from this criteria, you might suggest: Fleek, Doughnut, Bae, Kale, or Man-Bun as options for Word of the Year, 2015.

But you would be wrong. According to ‘The Committee’ at Macquarie, none of these words are indicative of the year that was.

The chosen word? “Captain’s Call.”

“Captain’s call perfectly encapsulateeuronews (in English)
s what happened in Australia over the past year. There has been an interesting change in usage; an infrequent item of the jargon of cricket makes the leap into politics and is now being used generally with an ironic tinge to it that is very Australian,” 
write The Committee on the Macquarie Dictionary website.

Well firstly, ‘Captain’s Call’ is  two words. It’s not even hyphenated, guys.

And secondly, The Committee sounds a little bit too much like a secret organisation of nameless, billionaire philanthropists and I’m not sure I trust their judgement.

StonecuttersFeatFB

Abbott made the term Captain’s Call (in)famous as a way of justifying explaining his choice to make decisions without consulting others within his cabinet.

WATCH: Tony Abbott defend his ‘Captain’s Call’ of giving Prince Phillip a Knighthood.

Honourable mentions went to:

Lumbersexual- noun an urban male who wishes to associate himself by his appearance with a rugged outdoors way of life, as by wearing outdoor clothes such as check shirts, jeans and large boots combined with a beard as typical of a lumberjack.

“It used to be all about women’s fashions, but the words are now being dominated more and more by those related to men’s fashion. Lumbersexual is an organic phenomenon that someone has identified and named. It is a neat coinage and perfectly describes this style that peaked in Australia over the past year.”

And…

Deso- 

noun Colloquial a designated driver. Also, deso driver.

“The idea of deso is very topical. It combines a drinking culture with that of a law-abiding society. The word structure itself is typically Australian – a shortened form with an -o ending. It is astonishing how quickly and smoothly the deso became part of our lives.”

What would be your pick for Word Of The Year 2015?

JOIN THE CONVERSATION