beauty

Why Laura Byrne just shared two very honest, make-up free selfies.

For women, it can be rare to catch a glimpse of reality on social media.

Whether it be real, un-photoshopped representations of female bodies or makeup free faces, it’s undeniable that seeing oneself represented on social media feels good.

It means you aren’t alone, and that you are actually very normal, despite what the magazines might tell you.

So when Laura Byrne shared a photo of herself completely makeup free, suffering from pregnancy melasma (pigmentation), the people of Instagram were incredibly grateful.

In the post, she explained that she posted a question about pigmentation, and that she was flooded with responses.

“Yesterday I posted a question about pigmentation (melasma) to my stories and my DM’s were blowing up like an inflatable pool toy on New Years Day,” she wrote.

“Pregnant or not – pigmentation freaking sucks! A lot of you were confused, as my skin for the most part looks pretty perfect in photos (social media…. a lie…. gasp). The truth is I’m guilty of only posting my best photos, and touching up my melasma with filters when you can see it,” she added.

 

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Yesterday I posted a question about pigmentation (melasma) to my stories and my DM’s were blowing up like an inflatable pool toy on New Years Day. Pregnant or not – pigmentation freaking sucks! A lot of you were confused, as my skin for the most part looks pretty perfect in photos (social media…. a lie…. gasp). The truth is I’m guilty of only posting my best photos, and touching up my melasma with filters when you can see it. This post is not a pity party, it’s a reminder that real life is not an endless scroll of filtered skin, luscious hair, butts that defy gravity and inspirational quotes. It’s ok to want to look your best, but it’s more important to accept yourself for all the things that make you uniquely you, melasma and all ✌????peace out xxx

A post shared by Laura Byrne ???? (@ladyandacat) on

She continued to share an important message about social media.

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“This post is not a pity party, it’s a reminder that real life is not an endless scroll of filtered skin, luscious hair, butts that defy gravity and inspirational quotes. It’s ok to want to look your best, but it’s more important to accept yourself for all the things that make you uniquely you, melasma and all,” she concluded the post.

Her fans responded with overwhelming positivity.

“Good on you for showing people you can be yourself on social media!” commented one user.

“Thank you for this, Laura,” wrote another.

Melasma is a skin condition that affects primarily women, and presents as the formation of uneven dark/brown patches on the skin.

Those with dark skin are at a higher risk of developing pigmentation, but there are many other factors that contribute.

According to Healthline, estrogen and progesterone sensitivity are linked to pigmentation, meaning birth control, pregnancy and hormone therapy can lead to melasma.

The condition can also be caused by sun exposure, as ultraviolet rays affect the cells that control pigmentation.

Dermal therapist James Vivian explained to Mamamia last year that about 50 per cent of his female clients have melasma, which is just one type of pigmentation.

“The condition is hormonally induced pigment which sits quite deeply in the skin in the dermal aspect of the skin rather than the epidermal aspect so it’s not so available to treatment and it’s very sensitive to things like light and heat,” he explains.

Listen Below: Learn about different types of concealer and facials on the You Beauty podcast. Post continues after podcast.

While there is no “cure” for melasma, there are options to minimise it (if you want to, of course).

“Treatment involves predominantly good work at home with sun protection on a daily basis and reapplication every couple of hours and using the right acids and the right de-pigmentation ingredients like Vitamin Cs and Vitamin As,” Vivian explains.

“In-clinic treatments is a way to really move that pigment through the skin a lot but it will always be there so we really try to ingrain that into clients that we can make it look so much better but it will always be there,” he added.

Melasma or not, being sun safe is always a good idea.

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