fashion

10 First Nations fashion brands you need to know about, and what we're shopping from them.

It's NAIDOC Week, with celebrations being held across the country to recognise the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

One brilliant way to celebrate First Nations excellence is shopping from their brands - and there are so many amazing homegrown labels to get across.

We've rounded up 10 of our favourite Aboriginal owned brands that make everything from clothing printed with original art to statement accessories you'll want to wear daily. Happy shopping!

But first, watch children in the Indigenous communities of the Kimberley, Western Australia tell us what they aspire to be. Post continues below.


Video via Mamamia.

Maara Collective.

Maara Collective is a luxury resortwear brand that works closely with Indigenous artists and creatives. 

Founded in 2019 by Yuwaalaraay woman Julie Shaw, the brand draws inspiration from Country to create contemporary pieces - think beautiful linen sets, silk shirts and swimwear.

And with every purchase, Maara Collective gives back proceeds to support training and education in remote Aboriginal communities.

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Talati Linen Blazer, $485.

Image: Maara Collective/Mamamia. 

Lowanna Printed Silk Skirt, $365.

Image: Maara Collective/Mamamia. 

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Haus Of Dizzy.

Love a bit of bling? Then look no further than Haus of Dizzy. 

The accessories brand, started by Wiradjuri jewellery designer Kristy Dickinson, sells a range of bold and colourful statement earrings, necklaces and bracelets (among other things) to spice up any outfit. 

Often featuring powerful political and social messages, each piece is designed, laser-cut, hand-painted and assembled in the company’s studio in Melbourne/Naarm.

Custom Personalised Name Heart Earrings, $49.

Image: Haus of Dizzy/Mamamia. 

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Grande Deadly Stacked Mirror Earrings, $69.

Image: Haus of Dizzy/Mamamia. 

Consequence of Change.

Although Consequence of Change isn't Aboriginal owned, it works with local and international creatives to design fun and colourful limited edition collections.

Most recently, the Melbourne-based brand collaborated with Indigenous artist Niketa Law. 

The collection features a top, dress, leggings and heated puffer coat - a first for the Australian market and most recently worn by Narelda Jacobs on The Project and Big Mob Brekky.

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Full Length Leggings, $89.

Image: Consequence of Change/Mamamia. 

Heated Puffer Jacket, $399.

Image: Consequence of Change/Mamamia. 

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Myrrdah

If you're into Aboriginal art, you'll love Myrrdah. 

Created by four sisters - Jaunita, Dale, Cheryl and Glenda - who are descendants of the Kalkatungu tribe, Myrrdah is an ethical, 100 per cent Australian made and Aboriginal owned label.

If you have a stalk of their Instagram or website, you'll see tops, dresses and pants featuring warm tones and patterns inspired by the land that surrounds them.

And they don't just make clothes - they also paint authentic Aboriginal art over at Cungelella Art.

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Margie Shirt (Print), $295.

Image: Myrrdah/Mamamia. 

Lizzy Dress, $395.

Image: Myrrdah/Mamamia. 

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Ngali.

Founded in 2018 by Melbourne-based Denni Francisco, a proud Wiradjuri woman, Ngali showcases the talent of remote Aboriginal artists by bringing their artworks to life on high-quality clothes and accessories.

As Francisco says, "Some of Australia’s most talented Indigenous artists live in places you’ve never heard of and maybe you’ll never see. 

"We help bring their unique artwork to the world by taking it beyond wall display and onto garments to walk the streets and show up in a myriad of places around the world."

In 2021, the brand was awarded the National Indigenous Fashion Award, and most recently, appeared in the Indigenous Fashion Project runway at Afterpay Australian Fashion Week.

Yiramir Pure Cotton Knit Scarf, $125.

Image: Ngali/Mamamia. 

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Black Bark Silk Pants, $395.

Image: Ngali/Mamamia. 

Nungala Creative.

Nungala Creative is a 100 per cent Aboriginal owned and operated communications and creative agency. 

Established by proud Warumungu/Wombaya woman Jessica Johnson, the business produces innovative content with a distinct Aboriginal voice, which we love.

Whilst not technically a fashion brand, the agency sells epic jewellery, clothing, accessories and art on their website.

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Neon Gold Mini Hoop dangle, $48.

Image: Nungala Creative/Mamamia. 

Blak Heart Shirt, $69.

Image: Nungala Creative/Mamamia. 

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Lore by Shannon Brett.

Shannon Brett is a Wakka Wakka, Gurang Gurang and Butchulla artist and designer, and her label, Lore by Shannon Brett, features her own designs.

As explained on her website, her unisex garments - ranging from a size 12-22 - "reference local stories centred in the 'Australian' black experience as vibrant expressions in material form."

And all of them are manufactured respectfully on the lands of the Yuggera, Turrbal and Gimuy peoples.

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The Shifty-frill Dress - Navy, $364.

Image: Lore/Mamamia. 

The Swing-frill top in Bunya Bunya - Light Blue, $275.

Image: Lore/Mamamia. 

Clothing The Gaps.

For clothing that makes a statement, check out Clothing The Gaps, an Aboriginal owned and led social enterprise that unites people through fashion and cause.

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Managed by health professionals, the brand produces merch with a meaning, whether through statements or the Aboriginal flag (or both) printed on clothing and accessories.

And this year, the brand has created their own NAIDOC collection called 'Get Up! Stand Up! Show Up!', "a call to action for a genuine commitment from all Australians to do more to make our country better for First Nations peoples."

Something we can all get behind.

NAIDOC Stand Up! Hoodie, $120.

Image: Clothing The Gaps/Mamamia. 

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Honouring Country Tote Bags, $35.

Image: Clothing The Gaps/Mamamia. 

Gammin Threads.

Upgrade your loungewear collection with Gammin Threads.

Created by Tahnee Edwards, a proud descendant of the Yorta Yorta, Taungurung, Boonwurrung and Mutti Mutti nations, the Melbourne-based fashion label is a side hustle and creative outlet from her full-time job at an Aboriginal family violence prevention service. 

As Tahnee writes on her website, "Gammin Threads was born from a love of typography, language and Blak pride.

"It consists of deadly chillwear and accessories for people who believe in living colourfully, paying respect and empowering women."

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Darlin Tee, $59.

Image: Gammin Threads/Mamamia. 

Lubly Hoodie, $129.

Image: Gammin Threads/Mamamia. 

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Liandra Swim.

Jetting off on a holiday soon? Pick up some new swimmers from Liandra Swim.

Created by Yolngu woman Liandra Gaykamangu, the brand sells a range of signature bikinis and one-pieces which are inspired by Aboriginal culture. 

They're also an eco-conscious and ethically minded brand, so big ticks all around.

Cathy One Piece, $280.

Image: Liandra Swim/Mamamia. 

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Doris Top - Baru Print, $100.

Image: Liandra Swim/Mamamia. 

Do you have any brands to add to our list? Let us know in the comments below.

Feature Image: Mamamia/Maara Collective/Haus of Dizzy/Gimme Threads/Nungala Creative.

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