Luxury US gym Equinox uses images of a breastfeeding woman in ad campaign, “Commit to something.”

A controversial ad campaign for a luxury gym in the US has featured a model breastfeeding two babies with a call to ‘commit to something’.

The marketing team say the advertisement shows a young mother “unapologetically breastfeeding in public”.

Model Lydia Hearst was photographed by fashion photographer Steven Klein to show “the powerful, conscious, human expression of commitment,” according to the ad team.

A collection of seven images for the high-end gym Equinox are all branded with #committosomething.

“The concept of commitment is bold, incredibly powerful, and it’s real, especially in a world today where commitment is lacking,” said Carlos Becil, Equinox Chief Marketing Officer.

The advert shows model Lydia Hearst breastfeeding. Image Steven Klein.

The campaign organisers say viewers can “take action, to start committing, to celebrate the attitude and merit of dedication”.

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So how committed do you have to be to breastfeed? What kind of dedication do you need?

Here are 10 things that are easier to commit to than breastfeeding.

  1. A university degree
  2. Getting up early/Early-shifts.
  3. Continuous night-shifts at work.
  4. Any kind of plans.
  5. A sugar-free diet.
  6. A lousy boyfriend.
  7. Boring paperwork.
  8. A disappointing Netflix series.
  9. Living without electricity.
  10. A job.

However, these ad people are right, there is a dedication needed to go to the gym - but it pales in comparison to breastfeeding.

Fashion photographer Steven Klein says the campaign addresses "today’s issues and social commentaries".

The campaign has been launched at a time when there has been a movement to normalise breastfeeding in the US.

In January, actress Alyssa Milano defended her breastfeeding photos during an interview on The Wendy Williams Show.

Video by The Wendy Williams Show

US campaigners have even changed mothers rights and laws surrounding breastfeeding in public.

So this ad campaign widens the discussions around breastfeeding in the US, but it could be read in a variety of ways.

It could be interpreted as a celebration of breastfeeding and women's strength or it could suggest women are not committed who don't breastfeed.

I'm not sure how to read it. All I know is that I certainly didn't look like that when I was feeding.

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