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Dolly Everett's parents have been named 'Local Heroes' a year after they lost their daughter.

The parents of teenager Amy “Dolly” Everett, who died in January last year, have been named Australia’s Local Hero of the Year for 2019.

Kate and Tick Everett were presented with the award at a ceremony in Canberra on Friday, for their work with Dolly’s Dream, which aims to raise awareness about the potentially devastating effects of cyber-bullying.

The couple started the foundation to create positive change and a legacy for their daughter who took her own life in January 2018 after being bullied online.

Kate Everett fought back tears after accepting the award at the National Arboretum in Canberra.

“In the words of Dolly speak even if your voice shakes, so please excuse us if our voices shake,” she said.

“Out of our tragedy, we created Dolly’s Dream. A vision to educate families and communities on the impacts that bullying has on young lives.”

Kate and Tick Everett
2019 Local Heroes Kate and Tick Everett pose for photos at the 2019 Australian of the Year Awards. Image: AAP.
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Dolly's Dream delivers community education on bullying issues and strategies for preventing and mitigating bullying, through cultural change and victim support.

More than 250 communities have held fundraisers and events to support Dolly's Dream, with a particular focus on regional and rural Australia.

National Australia Day Council chair Danielle Roche paid tribute to their efforts to prevent other tragedies from happening.

"Kate and Tick Everett endured heartbreak and put their own grief aside to drive cultural change, prevent bullying and ensure that other children and parents never have to suffer as their family has," she said.

"By founding Dolly's Dream to confront bullying, they have displayed incredible courage and commitment."

If you or someone you know is struggling with their mental health, please seek professional help and contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636. If you are in immediate danger, call 000.

With AAP.

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