An Instagram influencer has shared a side to plastic surgery we don’t normally see.

Diary of a Fit Mommy Sia Cooper shares plastic surgery regret. Image: Instagram.

Sia Cooper never shies away from a conversation about body image and positivity.

The social media star is well-known for her Instagram profile boasting 1.2 million followers, and her mega-successful blog, Diary of a Fit Mommy.

She’s used to having eyes on her – earlier this year Sia received backlash and even death threats for leaving comments on celebrity Insta photos (yeah, that’s where you know her from) – and told Mamamia she knew a recent post outlining her plastic surgery regret would be controversial.

She shared her story alongside a powerful photo of her with plastic surgery style markings on her body.

“All of the markings represent what’s not “perfect enough” for us to accept on our own bodies whether it’s breasts, nose, body fat, or even tummies,” she captioned the photo.

“I remember sitting in the surgeon’s office seven years ago hopeful that bigger breasts would make me feel better about myself.”

She wrote that she wishes she could go back and tell her 21-year-old self that she is perfect the way she is and didn’t need a breast augmentation.

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“I would scream at her that she’s perfect. I would tell her that she does not need to be cut into like a slice of meat. I would tell her that it wasn’t worth it. I would hug her. Cry with her. I would tell her that she was beautiful and didn’t have to do this.”

 

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When you go to a plastic surgeon’s office, they mark your body just like this-depending on what you’re having done. I know. I’ve been there once. All of the markings represent what’s not “perfect enough” for us to accept on our own bodies whether it’s breasts (????????‍♀️), nose, body fat, or even tummies. I remember sitting in the surgeon’s office 7 years ago hopeful that bigger breasts would make me feel better about myself. Cosmetic surgery doesn’t make you feel better though.. you only feel better when you start to accept the things you shouldn’t be changing in the first place. If I could go back and tell that 21 year old girl awaiting her consult for a breast augmentation, I would scream at her that she’s perfect. I would tell her that she does not need to be cut into like a slice of meat. I would tell her that it wasn’t worth it. I would hug her. Cry with her. I would tell her that she was beautiful and didn’t have to do this. Why am I posting this? Because millions of females and males struggle with the alluring idea of getting nipped and tucked. They make it look so glorious and amazing! But what if I told you that women who get breast implants are statistically 4 times as likely to commit suicide after? You would think otherwise, right? Since getting surgery, my depression and anxiety has worsened. The ability to accept myself has worsened because it makes you want MORE. This might be a triggering message, but I urge you to love yourself. No body deserves to be marked on as if it needs changing. It’s degrading and it’s never a good feeling. I’m not totally against plastic surgery, but I can’t say that I’m really for it anymore. To each their own. But I want you to look good and long at this photo noticing the cut lines. It’s sad isn’t it? We feel so much pressure to be perfect because plastic surgery is the norm. Yes, implants, fat transfers, liposuction, nose jobs, eyebrow lifts, and even chin jobs are the NORM for many Instagram influencers and people in general. THIS is why I urge you to never compare. Unfollow anyone that is “too perfect” for you. Follow those who do good for your mental health. You’re worth it! YOU DO NOT NEED FIXING.

A post shared by SIA ALEXIS COOPER???? (@diaryofafitmommyofficial) on

Sia said she shared the photo because she wanted to make sure people were seeing both sides of plastic surgery – not just the “glorious and amazing” side we usually see on social media.

“I had a breast augmentation at the age of 21 before I ever became a personal trainer and social media influencer,” she told Mamamia.

“As the years went on, I realised that after having my breasts done, I would pick apart NEW areas on my body that I felt ‘needed work’ such as my nose, butt, lips, etc. The augmentation is the only thing I’ve had done. I still feel like plastic surgery makes you crave more and can be addictive.”

She said she wants her followers, and most importantly, her daughter to accept themselves as they are. If they want to get work done, it should be for themselves.

“I loved my breasts after the augmentation, but it had me picking myself apart in other areas and body dysmorphia was already something I struggled with since my early teen years. My mother would frequently nitpick and point out what she saw as physical flaws. That had an impact,” she said.

“I was also married at a younger age, and encouraged to get implants by my first husband. After getting the implants, what seemed to be a boost (no pun intended) in the beginning turned into another self esteem blow.”

Her body changed after her two children, and thanks to the lessons she learned as a mother, surrounding herself with people who build her up and her “incredibly supportive” second husband, Sia learned to love it just the way it was.

“My children saw me in this natural light that nobody else does … They look up to me as if I’m the best thing ever. I had to literally realise this and practice a sort of mantra I share with my kids and others: ‘You’re beautiful from the inside out’. It is so important to focus on how your body works rather than how you think it looks.”

“Kids do not spend minutes or hours looking in a mirror wishing they appeared differently. They are happy as they are! We need to be more like this!”

“My nose was something I struggled with for most of my life. When I saw my daughter had MY nose, I stopped considering rhinoplasty. Why would I want to change something that resembled my daughter?”

Despite her own experience with it, Sia is not anti-plastic surgery.

“There was backlash on the post from women who have had enhancements and are completely happy with theirs. I was not judging anyone for getting plastic surgery – if it makes you happy, great!”

“However I am just sharing my own experience here while promoting body positivity. For the most part, this resounded with a lot of women who thanked me for sharing my experience.”

Comparison has become the thief of joy when it comes to Instagram and social media so this is why I encourage everyone to unfollow those who make them feel bad about themselves.”

She told Mamamia she is considering having her implants removed and has had a consultation for this.

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