beauty

From Go-To to La Mer: What a dermatologist really thinks of these 6 buzzy skincare products.

There are SO many sexy new skincare products slinking around our social feeds on the daily. Harping on about how good they are, what influencers like them, how many push-ups they can do, etc. 

And while we all love buying products that are new and jazzy and exciting - it can be a really tricky game. It can! It really can.

Because sometimes you go with the hype and find out a product a) doesn't deliver on its flashy promises; b) isn't right for your skin type; or c) isn't a morning person.

Watch: I tried the lube makeup trick. And the results kinda surprised me. Post continues below.


Video via Mamamia.

And there's nothing quite as disappointing as spending your money on something that doesn't cut it.

So, because I've seen quite a few hyped-up products winking at me on my social feeds, I thought I'd put them to the test and ask dermatologist and skin wizard Dr Katherine Armour from Bespoke Skin Technology if they're actually worth the buzz.

Here's what Dr Armour thinks of the trendiest products on social media.

Charlotte Tilbury Collagen Superfusion Facial Oil, $100.

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First up? This newbie from Charlotte Tilbury.

Just as a side note, I was actually super intrigued to find out what Dr Armour thought about this one - I've been using it on and off since its launch earlier this month, and while the fragrance is a bit much for me (smells like a fancy hippie) - I've found it to be lovely and hydrating on my skin. 

But is it worth the spendy price tag of $100?

Well, Dr Armour isn't hella convinced that it's anything special. 

"As a starting premise, I love all things Charlotte Tilbury, and I’ve been purchasing her makeup from the UK for years. But this is a good example of all 'show' with not much science to back up the marketing claims," said Dr Armour. 

Listen: Psst... we also tried the Charlotte Tilbury Beautiful Skin Foundation! Find out our first impressions on this episode of You Beauty. Post continues below.

"The packaging and marketing around this product are elegant in the extreme. But, unfortunately, this product is making claims to make changes to the skin that just aren’t possible with the technology they’ve used these." 

Go on...

"Charlotte Tilbury’s website states: 'The supercharged ACTIVES includes a collagen matrix of Collageneer®, Cocoyl Hydrolysed Collagen, Nanocacao O and MAXnolia O which work together to help improve the feeling of skin ELASTICITY, FIRMNESS, PLUMPNESS, and SMOOTHNESS for a youthful look.'

"Elasticity, firmness, and plumpness are qualities that come from our skin’s dermis where collagen and elastin reside. These molecules will be far too large to penetrate through our skin into the dermis. So, they will not be capable of exerting effects there."

Interesting! What about the plumping effects, though?

"Any 'plumping' effects will be from increased hydration, and will, therefore, be temporary. I know it’s marketing, but I groan internally when I see claims like, 'Skin LOOKS FOUR TIMES MORE RADIANT, SMOOTH AND EVEN.' This is hocus pocus as far as I’m concerned."

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When it comes to what the product does do well, it is packed with hydrating oils.

"On the upside, this product contains a multitude of hydrating oils, which will leave a lovely temporary glow on the skin. At $100, it’s rather expensive. But, we’re paying for a piece of Charlotte, which will be worth it for many.

"If you want your skin plumped, I’d focus on products containing, retinoids, bakuchiol, AHAs, and polyhydroxy acids. Also, if you have sensitive or reactive skin, I’d steer clear of this product. It contains a multitude of botanical oils (including eucalyptus, bitter orange, and lavender) which will make it smell divine, but are not ideal for those with an impaired skin barrier."

Ahh, so maybe steer clear if this sounds like you.

But hey, if this facial oil is something that works really well for your skin and you can afford to splurge on it - go for it!

Otherwise, as Dr Armour points out, there may be more affordable facial oils on the market if you're looking for similar benefits.

Naked Sundays SPF 50+ Serum, $49.95.

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If you're a dame with a social media account, we can guarantee you've seen this everywhere.

"I have actually ordered this product myself, and am waiting with bated breath to try it! This product looks like the answer to so many of our prayers. A super light, high SPF sunscreen that is suitable for those with breakout-prone skin and sits well under makeup," said Dr Armour.

"The fact that it is invisible means that those with darker skin types won’t need to worry about a white cast on the skin. The watermelon extract, tomato extract and Kakadu plum contain high levels of vitamin C and lycopene, which are powerful skin protecting and brightening antioxidants."  

Oooh! Sounds promising!

"For a skincare, primer, high SPF fusion product, $49.95 seems like great value to me. Given that this product has had to meet the TGA’s high sunscreen standards here in Australia, I’d feel confident in trying it.

"The only question will be, how much of this serum we need to apply to meet the SPF50+."

Wanna find out more? Check out my review of Naked Sundays SPF 50+ Serum.

Go-To The Repair Shop, $50.

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This is another newbie I've actually tried and loved. As someone with dry skin, I find this is wonderfully hydrating and calming - especially when my skin is chucking a tanty after trialling too many products (you can read my full review here).

But what does it look like to an expert? Is it as good as we think it is?

"This hydrating mask looks like it’s worth the hype. It contains just the right number of ingredients to do the job that it promises, at a reasonable price point," said Dr Armour.

"Ceramides, niacinamide and pro-vitamin B5 support the skin barrier and soothe. Hyaluronic acid and glycerine will hydrate. Bravo on this product Go-To!!!"

Omg HUGE. Full marks, Go-To.

Cultured Biome One Serum, $118.

Cultured is a new brand that recently launched in Mecca, and it's all about strengthening and supporting the microbiome and skin barrier. 

But at $118, it's not exactly the cheapest serum on the market - so you'd really want to make sure it's going to deliver, yeah?

"Things that I like about this product – it is un-fragranced and does not claim to contain pro-biotics. It includes 'pre' and 'post' biotics. Black Tea ferment protects against glycation. I just don’t believe that the science is quite there to say that we need to be 'feeding' our skin to ensure that it's microbiome remains 'strong and diverse'."

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Interesting...

"Our microbiome is crucial to skin health. But, this serum claims that Inulin 'acts as a prebiotic hydrator that helps the microbiome form a hydrating film that delivers faster, deeper and longer-lasting hydration than hyaluronic acid.' I’d like to see the studies on this."

"Hyaluronic acid usually needs to be locked in with another moisturiser. So, it’s not a great comparator in my humble opinion."

Touche.  

La Mer Treatment Lotion, $160.

Celebrities and beauty aficionados rave about La Mer on the reg. It's one of those luxury skincare brands that just cost So. Much. Money.

While I'm sure you've heard of the famous Creme de La Mer, this is one of the brand's most recent launches: La Mer Treatment Lotion - a product that you're supposed to use after cleansing.

"This looks like an unnecessary expensive extra step to me. This product contains the La Mer 'Miracle BrothTM' which is already present in their iconic moisturising cream.

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"Their website says that you should apply this product to provide sustained hydration and prepare your skin for the rest of their products.

"At $160, I don’t think that it offers much over their existing products. It seems that it may adequately hydrate on its own for those with very oily skin if you have a very large budget for skincare."

Tatcha The Texture Tonic, $90.

"The ingredients used in this product look to deliver skin smoothing, calming and light chemical exfoliation as promised via fruit-derived AHAs and niacinamide," said Dr Armour.

She does point out, however, that $90 seems quite steep for such a simple product. 

"But, you’re paying for brand and beautiful packaging here as well." 

So there you have it! Have you tried any of the above products before? What are your thoughts? Share with us in the comment section below.

Feature Image: Instagram/@drkatherinearmour; Go-To; Charlotte Tilbury; Mecca.

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