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ROADTEST: We tried 8 gluten free breads in 9 days to sort the good from the very bad.

Sometimes you just want a piece of warm, crunchy, carby bread.

But for many people, it's unfortunately not an option: your mind says yes, but your body says no.

The good news is, while being diagnosed with gluten intolerance or coeliac disease can feel like the end of the world for many of us bread-scoffing folks, it isn’t as hard to make the switch as it once was.

WATCH: An easy, gluten-free lunch option. Post continues below.


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With so many gluten free options hitting the supermarket shelves, often with a hefty price tag, it can be hard to decipher which product is worth the dough. I’ve always loved carbs but I recently found I wasn’t digesting my morning toast as well as I used to – this rock in my gut would sit with me all morning, adding an unnecessary sluggish feeling to my day.

I decided to see what life was like on the gluten free side. As I'm a vegan, to make this bread review suitable for all gluten free lifestyles, my partner has helped me eat his way through the non-vegan options as most of the cheaper GF options contain egg.

This is your ultimate guide to gluten free bread, whether you’re intolerant, coeliac or looking to find alternatives that don’t make you feel so sluggish! Let’s dive right in.

Helga’s Gluten Free Traditional Wholemeal 500g

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Contains: Wholemeal Rice Flour, Tapioca Starch, Egg White, Soy Flour.

Price: $7.00

Verdict: 4 out of 5 slices

If you’re good with egg and soy, try Helga’s. Massive slices, soft consistency and easy for sandwiches or toasties. If you want a durable slice for sandwiches stick with white or wholemeal; the mixed grain and seeded loaves can break apart when fresh. Note their bread is a little on the sweeter side, so check the label before purchasing if you’re conscious. The average price point is due to its smaller number of slices.

Abbott’s Gluten Free White Rustic 500g 

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Contains: Tapioca Starch, Rice Flour, Egg White, Soy Flour.

Price: $7.00

Verdict: 4.5 out of 5 slices

Another great option but it is a tad smaller than their rival Helga’s. Sometimes size doesn’t matter because Abbott’s is best for flavour, texture and feels ‘less processed’ than Coles and Woolies counterparts, and not as sweet as Helga’s. Many gluten free breads taste better toasted than fresh, but this one is great both fresh and toasted! Worth the average price point for the quality.

Swiss Natural Gluten Free Loaf 680g

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Contains: Tapioca & Corn Starch, Rice & Soy Flour. No egg or lactose. Vegan friendly.

Price: $8.49

Verdict: 3 out of 5 slices

A huge step forward for gluten intolerant bread lovers is the fact there are options for large, sandwich-worthy slices, just like this Swiss loaf. This loaf has more of a grainy, wholemeal, almost nutty flavour to it and while the dense consistency isn’t as fluffy as others, it made for crunchy toast. It didn’t rate as high because the price point is steep compared to spending an extra dollar for my preferred Healthybake, but then again I prefer a soft, white bread than grainy. 

Woolworths Free From Gluten White 550g (left)

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Contains: Tapioca Starch, Rice Flour, Egg White.

Price: $4.50 

Verdict: 3 out of 5 slices

This super white loaf almost blinded me when I opened the vacuum-sealed packet, which isn’t great for packaging practicality. On first impression, I thought the Coles brand would beat Woolies, however upon tasting it turns out the Woolies brand has a more bread-like flavour and texture, is more dense and isn’t sweet. While toasting this one is better than eating it fresh, the affordable price will attract plenty of GF shoppers.

Liberate Crumpets 240g

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Contains: Tapioca & Corn Starch, Brown Rice Flour. No lactose, yeast, dairy or egg. Vegan friendly.

Price: $7.10

Verdict: 2.5 out of 5 slices

The cutest little crumpet you ever did see. Before you freak out, it’s gluten free Vegemite – revolutionary! While toast might be your go-to brekkie, I thought I’d throw in crumpets for good measure – while they’re small in size, they taste dynamite. Soft, delectable flavour but needs a little more toasting than normal crumpets. Average rating due to price for just 4 small crumpets.

Coles White Bread 500g (right)

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Contains: Tapioca Starch, Rice Flour, Egg White.

Price: $4.50 

Verdict: 2 out of 5 slices

While the price point will be welcome to many gluten intolerant folks, it does come with a sweeter, spongier vibe than Woolies. Better toasted than fresh and with the thick slices a bonus, it doesn’t make up for lack of flavour and bready texture. The packaging is a let down – once you open the packet you’ll need to find another bag to keep it fresh.

Schar Gluten Free Classic Sourdough 300g

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Contains: Corn & Rice Starch, Soy Protein. No lactose, dairy, GMO or egg. FODMAP and vegan friendly.

Price: $9.45

Verdict: 2 out of 5 slices

A hefty price tag for such little bread both in amount and surface area. It’s the smallest slice I’ve come across, but does the flavour make up for lack of size and high price? The answer is hell yes it does. 

I had my doubts judging by the outside, but once I tried it both fresh and toasted, it blew my mind. It packs a punch with a buttery flavour, while soft and fresh as if it just came out of the oven – I just wish there was more of it at a lower price! Points deducted for very exxy price compared to the weight and impractical packaging.

Well & Good White Bread 750g

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Contains: Corn & Tapioca Starch. No egg, dairy, soy. Vegan friendly.

Price: $12.59

Verdict: 1.5 out of 5 slices

Your eyes are not deceiving you. While it came with just about 20 slices and was white as paper, my wallet was not well and good after purchasing this Well & Good loaf. Look, it wasn’t terrible bread; the slices were the thinnest I’ve come across and quite soft, it’s definitely better toasted. I made a toastie which held up nicely but didn’t quite brown like the Healthybake. I gave it a low score because the price made me take out a small loan at the bank and slices were too thin for my liking.

Final thoughts

While going gluten free is now easier than ever, it can still be hard to find the bread that’s right for you without first trying it. My advice is to freeze as soon as you buy, giving your bread a longer life and decreasing food waste. 

When figuring out a verdict we took into consideration flavour, price, size, packaging and quality – we hope this guide helps you find your next favourite! And feel free to recommend the best ones you've come across in the comments below.

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Correction: This article previously included references to Healthybake Khorasan Organic Sourdough, which is not gluten free.


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