BRW Cover


BRW Magazine has faced a mini-backlash over its cover featuring muesli queen Carolyn Creswell. The complaints prompted an interesting discussion by reporter Georgie Dent about the representation of women in business.

She wrote on the BRW blog:

“Oddly enough our cover is something we take seriously. The subjects who grace it are invariably proven operators in business who don’t need to be wearing a suit to show that they want to be taken seriously.

Carolyn runs an impressive business manufacturing breakfast cereals and the cover image depicted that in a way we thought was fresh and interesting. We’re a business magazine and where it is possible to depart from an image of a person wearing a suit, we leap at it. The early signs from newsagents suggest customers welcomed the cover.

In recent weeks, we have heard from readers who believe we don’t feature enough women in our magazine. When planning features, covers, interviews and focus points for the magazine, the only agenda we pursue is great content. We are a meritocracy. Our content is derived and created from a variety of sources. We have stories pitched to us, we pitch stories ourselves, we read widely, we brainstorm, we regularly meet with people on the coalface of business, we have flagship issues on particular topics – and from there our content falls. We don’t set out to exclude men any more than we set out to include women because to follow either of those paths would be disingenuous.”

Here’s what else is on our radar today:

1. Mining billionaire Clive Palmer is refusing to pay a $333 speeding fine. He was booked doing 27km/h over the speed limit on the Gold Coast.

2. Queen Elizabeth has someone break in her shoes so she can be sure they will be comfortable during her many engagements. Her team also catalogue her dresses. By name. One is called Buttercup.

3. The ‘Tooth Fairy’ is now paying, on average, $5 a pop for children’s teeth. What’s the going rate in your house?

4. Australia is the happiest developed nation in the world, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Their annual Better Life Index saw Oz beat traditional winners Norway on measures such as jobs, incomes and health.

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